DoubleClicks.info About Computers for Newbies & Everyone Else

September 22, 2015

Windows 10, Part 5

Starting today we will look at some of the new features found in Windows 10.  The most anticipated addition to Windows 10 (over 8.1) is the Start Menu.  The start menu has had a big change between W8.1 and W10; however, not so great between W7 and W10.  

The start menu is accessed through the Windows button on the left end of the taskbar as it has been for past generations of Windows.  You can also press the actual Windows key on your keyboard to pop up the menu.

There are two major sections of the new menu, left and right…easy so far. 

Ron's current Windows 10 Start MenuThe left side which is a list area has several sections.  From the top down they are User info, "Most used" apps and "Recently added" apps along with several system settings and search.

User info shows your icon and username for your account if you set it up when you installed Windows 10.  If you click it you get, "Change account settings" "Lock" and "Sign out."   Of course, you can use the keyboard combination of Windows key + L to lock your system.  However, in my opinion it should be in the bottom section near Power.  This is where it always was in the past. 

"Most used" and "Recently added" links’ uses are obvious for your applications.  However, unlike previous versions of windows, you cannot add apps you want to have in that side anywhere or in any way.  There have been many complaints about this online so keep your fingers crossed for a "new" old feature.  

The system settings labeled at the lower left have the defaults of File Explorer, Settings, Power and All apps.  File explorer has not changed much from the previous versions.  Settings is basically the old "Control Panel" with a modern new look. You may click the start button and type, "control panel" and still get to the old one if you prefer.  

When you click the Power link/button, Sleep, Shut down or Restart are found.  These have the same uses as previous versions with a new location.

Next you will find "All apps." This is where all your applications are found.  This was named "All Programs" in W7.

If you click All apps you will get an alphabetized list of all the applications installed on your computer.  Use your mouse, touch screen or up/down arrows to scroll the list.  Click on the application you want to run and it runs.  Another quick way to use the new applications list is to click on any the labeled letters in the list. When you do this a table of all letters will appear. To open Excel, for example, click on E and you will jump to all of the applications on your computer which start with E.  Then click the application name for it to open. 

If you cannot see all of the letters move your mouse to the top edge of the start menu.  When you see a double ended arrow click and drag up/down to resize the menu as needed.

Next week we look at the right side and tiles.

 Click a letter to find apps that start with that letter.        Click a letter to jump to alphabet

September 15, 2015

Windows 10, Part 4

Wi-Fi Sense

I will continue giving Windows 10 information for the next few weeks. I have received many questions, concerns and requests. So if you have W10 questions (or any tech questions) keep them coming.

Today I have one new warning which depending on your point-of-view could be bad.

Several weeks ago I wrote about linked accounts with Windows 10, check that column for details. If you set up W10 with a linked account you have a new feature added which is not explained in much detail after your setup.

It is, “Wi-Fi Sense” which is all about sharing. There is “good” and/or “bad” written all over this new feature. For an example, say your best friend from college comes over to your house. You have kept up with each other through a few calls and emails over the years.

Since they are in your Outlook.com address book and you used that account to link W10 they can immediately access your Wi-Fi network.  The good is that you do not have to type in or tell them your 47 digit password for your Wi-Fi.  That is very convenient; however, what if it is someone you do not want to give access to your Wi-Fi?  Pretend you have a friend who, unknown to you, was wanted by the NSA for being a major hacker.  You would then have shared your connection with them.  Farfetched on that last one but you know what I mean.  How about your curious grandkid that you do not want surfing the net unless you are with them?

(more…)

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