DoubleClicks.info About Computers for Newbies & Everyone Else

January 19, 2016

Temporary Email Address

Filed under: Columns — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , — Ron @ 5:44 am

Have there been times when you want to sign up for something on the internet but knew once you did you would get "IT?"  You know what "IT" is.  It is tons of spam from some stupid site that looks like it has something you want or need.

Sometimes even very reputable sites will start spamming you with lots of email.  They may get some small amount of money for sending your email address to their business partners.  There are many reasons you may be spammed when signing up for things online.

In order to avoid this there are several temporary email address sites out there you may use.  However, one that I currently use is called "Instance Mail."  You can use it to sign up for sites to whom you do not want to reveal your real email address.  You can find it online at instancemail.com.

InstanceMail main screenIt is quite simple to use.  Once at their site, you enter your real email address and press the "Get new address" button.   You will then see the new temporary address.  When I used it recently it gave me esprl1la2@instancemail.net as my address (no longer functioning).  I know, now you are thinking, "If I give them my real address won’t I get spam from them?"  The answer is no, you will not.  They are clean.  At least they were the last many times I have used Instance Mail.  I believe you are quite safe using their site.  They do need your email address to verify it as real and give you a little information on how to proceed.  

You may also want to take a look at the Options link.  There you will see that the expiration for this new email is 120 days.  You can make that a shorter time in various increments down to 30 minutes.

Another nice feature is that you can also get the site to send you an email reminder when your address expires.  Also, you may add a comment to your address which is actually just a short note letting you know what you used that address for in case you forget.

I find it very interesting as a "web guy" that all of the information you need is found on the one page of their site.  You go to that one link to get to everything you need to use at InstanceMail.com. Very convenient and easy to use. There are links there to reuse the email which allows you to extend it another 120 days as many times as you wish.

To sign up at another site use it just as you would your regular email address.  For instance, I signed up at a site with the instance email address and the site sent a verification email to the "fake" address.  However, it was received in my regular mail’s inbox.  That way I could verify it and then use the site.  After I was finished with that address I went back to the Instance Mail site and shut my recently used email address down. 

If you use this or any of the other temporary email sites let me know what they are and how you like them.  This can help you stay safe and more private online.

June 3, 2014

Try a New Browser

Last week I talked about an issue that was happening with Google’s Chromecast and Chrome browser related to Android tablets and phones.  I stated there, "…you could always try various browsers from time-to-time and find out what you may like.  It is easy to change back at any time."  When I wrote that I did not realize it would generate so much interest.  I received numerous emails asking if it is so easy, how is it done?

So here we go.

MSIE LogoAll windows computers come with Microsoft Internet Explorer (MSIE) built in as the default browser.  Keep in mind that whether you use that browser or not DO NOT try to uninstall it.  It is hard to do but if you get it off of your computer some other things on your computer will not work correctly or not at all.  That browser is tied to other areas of the Microsoft operating system.

The other most popular browsers are, in order of usage, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Internet Explorer, (already on your Windows system) Safari (created by Apple – available for both iOS & Windows devices) and Opera.  This information is from 2012 through today, according to W3Schools.com which tracks this data.  In 2011 Chrome and Firefox were swapped. 

Google Chrome                    Apple Safari                    Opera

So let us pretend that you want to try out Chrome and stop using MSIE for a little while.  Go to the site referenced above.  Click the download button and the application will start to download.  Depending on your settings it may ask if you want to run the application and you may also click, "Yes."  If you download it, find the downloaded file and double click it to start the installation.  If you chose to "run" the application you will now be at the installation screen.

It will ask you if you want to make it your default browser.  This means that if you click the check box for it to be default all of your links will open in Chrome after the installation completes instead of MSIE. 

Each of the others will install pretty much the same way.  You could even install all of these browsers at the same time.  Then you will have to choose which one you want to be the default browser. 

Choosing which browser is your default is easy in Windows 7 and 8. You just need to do a quick search.  In W7 click the start button and type, "default programs" and in W8 use the search feature and do the same. To get to search press the Windows key and tap the "S" key.  You may need to select "Set your default programs."  Once in the default program screen your default applications will be listed on the left side.  Find the current default browser and click on it once.  Then, "Choose defaults for this program" and you will see all of the current settings for the default browser.  To change it, choose the other browser you want to use from all of the choices provided.

Set your default programs

In Windows 7 it is sometimes easier to go into the Options of any browser and choose it to make it the default.  This will work with Windows 8 too with the exception of MSIE.

Happy surfing!

March 19, 2013

Google, Are You Kidding Me?

I have always been a big fan, supporter, promoter, etc. of Google.  That is until recently and here is why they are starting to work their way off of my radar. 

Google is performing what is termed "Spring Cleaning" on several of their products.  They shut down services/apps which they do not believe are being supported by users.  Two that were announced last year were Google Calendar Sync which basically ended December 14, 2012 and iGoogle which is scheduled to shut down on November 1, 2013.

Google Calendar Sync Option ScreenPersonally, I used those two extensively, especially Calendar Sync.  Calendar Sync performed an extremely important function for me.  It matched up my Outlook calendar at work to my personal Google calendar online.  Using this syncing process then allowed me to share my Google calendar with my wife so she could keep up with when I was going on trips, meetings after work, etc.  I could also choose to share it with anyone else I chose. 

It was a painless process since you set it up once and never look back.  It automatically "synced" the two calendars immediately when changes were made.  Since the Google calendar is online you can get to it anywhere you have a computer.

It was a very good application for the seven or eight years I had it Google.  Of course, they do say if you are currently using it you may continue…on that computer.  I conclude that means, "Once you have a new computer Calendar Sync is kaput!"

iGoogle was bad news to many people, too.  This was basically a Google home page you could use on your browser.  You could arrange "widgets" to show weather, local movie listings, news articles from specific sites, maps/directions, games, etc.  It essentially served as a geek’s morning paper where you could get the news you really wanted to read. 

Now this week Google made another announcement concerning spring cleaning.  Another of my beloved apps and many other peoples’… (According to the uproar online) Google Reader bites the dust.  Google Reader will be gone as of July 1, 2013.  Gee, Google, thanks for the big advance notice!  If you want to sign a petition to keep GR around visit: http://chn.ge/ZeVrkp and cast your vote.  You may join the other over 114, 500 people who had signed up within four days after the announcement was made.

Google Reader is and was in my opinion one of the best RSS Feed readers around.  We have talked before about RSS (Real Simple Syndication) so I will not belabor it.  Nevertheless, here it is in a nutshell.  It allows you to link to sites which offer RSS feeds (most sties) and get updates whenever they add comments or any content to the site. 

Google Reader logoGoogle Reader is simple to set up, is easy to use and has a very clean and user friendly interface.  I just recommended it to a group I spoke to a couple of weeks ago because it is so easy to use.

There are many other readers out there which have been recommended to be good replacements for Reader.  I have tried numerous quantities of them.  I will not mention those which failed my examination totally; however, there are two which are OK.  I need to state: they are still not as clean as Google Reader.  I would say the first runner-up is "feedly" (feedly.com) and at this point in my research, the closest one is "Newsblur" (newsblur.com).  Let me know as you continue the hunt for the best replacement.

Thanks, Google.

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