DoubleClicks.info About Computers for Newbies & Everyone Else

January 23, 2018

PIN or Password

Filed under: Columns — Tags: , , , , , , , — Ron @ 5:51 am

From emails I hear many got new Windows 10 computers for Christmas and it is encouraging you do use a Pin and not a Password to secure it. Is a four-digit pin a good idea to use over your either character password? Microsoft says it is a very good security feature for your computer. I say it may be after reviewing their thoughts.

When you first log onto a new W10 system it will ask you to log in with your Microsoft user account. If you do not have a MS account, i.e., Outlook.com, Hotmail.com or Live.com, it will encourage you to create one in Outlook.com.

After you are done logging in with your MS account (also called a linked account), you can use that email address and password to log into W10. You could also create a local account on your W10 PC and log in with that username and password.

If you are unsure of how MS/linked accounts differ from a local one check one of my previous articles, “Windows 10, Part 2” (rd.dblclx.com/LocalAcct). Microsoft also has a site telling you the pros and cons of each, (rd.dblclx.com/localvslinked).

It is easy to set up a pin. When logged into your computer click the Windows button on your keyboard. Type, “sign in options” and when you see it, click it.

Sign-in options

Scroll down to “PIN” and follow the directions.

Setup PIN

So, if you use your password for your login it should be long and cumbersome to keep others out. If you decide to use a pin, the default setting if a four-digit pin just like your bankcard uses. To me that seems too simple if someone really wants to hack your PC.

Here are some of the reasons MS says it is a good idea. One is that your pin is local to that PC. This means that you can set up different pins on each computer you own or use. It is tied to the hardware of that specific computer so if someone were wise enough to get it they would not have your Microsoft Account password too. That would keep other things like your email safe.

This makes good sense to me but since we are humans do we want to have to remember the various pins for each of your systems? Also, if like me you use an application to check your email all you have to do it start the app and there your email is, you do not need to enter a password. If bad guys get on your computer they have your email already. Even if you check your email online, like Gmail, Outlook, Hotmail, etc. I am willing to bet that you allow your browser to “memorize” your password for you so you do not have to type it in each time. Again, the hacker has you.

MS also says that you can make your pin more complicated. To do so start at the same “Sign in Options” window and scroll to PIN. Now click create or change pin, next click the checkbox by “Include letters and symbols.” Finally, you may click “Pin requirements” to see how hard you can make it, then create one.

Setup more complex PIN

But wait! If I already had a good strong complicated password for my original login why do I need to create another one that is hard to remember?

That is why I said it “may be” a good idea but I just do not see it from what I have learned. I use it because my four-digit pin is easy and quick but maybe not the most secure…what do you think?

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